Transfer or Visiting Applicants

St. Thomas Law accepts  Transfer Students each semester. If you have completed the first year of full-time legal studies, we invite you to apply for transfer to St. Thomas University School of Law. 
 
Transfer Credit Policy: Transferring from another Law School
Applications for transfer are considered from students who are in good academic standing at a law school. Credits earned at the other school will transfer in any class in which the student earned a “C” or better. Credits earned under a Pass/Fail grading system at another law school will not transfer. Grades associated with the credits accepted for transfer do not transfer and are not used in computing the student’s grade point average. Generally, no more than 30 credits will transfer from the other school. In some circumstances, more than 30 credits may transfer but, in no event, may more than 45 credits be accepted for transfer. 
  
Transfer students are required to submit the following:

  • Application
  • $60.00 non-refundable application fee
  • Personal Statement 
  • Two (2) recommendation letters from law school professors 
  • Letter of good standing from current law school 
  • A current LSAC CAS Report
  • Official transcripts reflecting all law school courses completed 
  • Official transcripts from the undergraduate college or university that awarded your bachelor’s degree, sent directly to St. Thomas Law School from the undergraduate school’s registrar.
 
Transfer Credit Policy: Admission after Completing St. Thomas University School of Law’s LL.M. Program
Applications for admission are considered from students who have previously successfully completed the LL.M. in Intercultural Human Rights Program at St. Thomas University School of Law. Pursuant to the provisions of ABA Standards for Approval of Law Schools, Standard 304 (Interpretation 304-7), the law school may accept up to 24 credits from students who previously successfully completed the LL.M. Program. The student must successfully have completed the LL.M. Program prior to admission to the law school program. Grades associated with the credits accepted for transfer do transfer and are used in computing the student’s grade point average. However, the credits and grades associated with the LL.M. program are not transferred until the last semester in which the student is otherwise completing the J.D. program. No more than 24 credits will transfer from the LL.M. program. No credits will be transferred unless the student successfully completed the LL.M. program and obtained the LL.M. degree.
  
Transfer Credit Policy from LLM Programs 
Pursuant to the provisions of ABA Standards for Approval of Law Schools, Standard 304 (Interpretation 304-7), the law school may accept up to 24 credits from students who previously successfully completed an LL.M. Program. The student must successfully have completed the LL.M. Program prior to admission to the law school program. Credit will only be given for successful completion of work that was part of a J.D. course. Grades associated with the credits accepted for transfer do not transfer and are not used in computing the student’s grade point average. No more than 24 credits will transfer from an LL.M. program. Additionally, no credits will be transferred unless the student successfully completed the LL.M. program and obtained the LL.M. degree.
 
Visiting Law Students
As with traditional transfer students, St. Thomas Law accepts a limited number of visiting students each semester. If you have completed the first year of full-time legal study at an ABA-approved law school and you have permission from your current institution to visit other law schools we encourage you to apply and join our warm and welcoming law school community, even if just for a semester.

Visiting students are required to submit the following:

  • Application
  • $60.00 non-refundable application fee
  • Personal Statement explaining your reason for wanting to visit St. Thomas Law
  • Letter from Dean of current law school granting you permission to visit at St. Thomas Law
  • A current LSAC CAS Report