Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies (General Track)

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Liberal Studies allows students to plan an individualized interdisciplinary curriculum, integrating courses from across the schools of the university. Given the diverse courses taken by those with a Liberal Studies degree, those graduating from this program have an uncommon breadth of knowledge. This degree is attractive to an undergraduate who desires broad, expansive thinking. It is also especially valuable for those who have returned to university with earlier credits to finish a general studies degree. Students are encouraged to combine this degree with a minor area of concentration or a specialization. For the Nursing Specialization (formerly Pre-Nursing) click here.

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For more information on the Program, contact Darrell Arnold, Ph.D. by email at darnold@stu.edu

Career Opportunities

This major offers students deep and well-rounded preparation for future professional or graduate study in Law or Business, as well as Communications, Criminal Justice, Education, History, Humanities, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Theology.

Students who major in Liberal Studies have gone on to have successful careers working for NGOs and businesses, and government.

Curriculum (Course Sampling)

Logic
This course introduces students to basic ideas of critical thinking and elementary logic, including informal fallacies and the structure of deductive and inductive arguments.

Introduction to Philosophy
This course introduces students to the discipline of philosophy through the examination of key figures in its history and philosophical theories about basic questions in philosophy. Among other things, this addresses questions about what humans can know (epistemology), about ultimate reality (metaphysics), and about what humans should do (ethics).

Ethics
Classically, the field of ethics is divided into (1) metaethics, which concerns the study and meaning of the origin of ethics, (2) normative ethics, which concerns the specific views proposed for determining the rightness and wrongness of action or ethical goodness, and (3) applied ethics, which looks at ethics applied to specific domains and questions. In this course, students will be introduced to all of these areas of ethics and become familiar with main views in Catholic ethics.

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