Course Information

Curriculum

The program is designed to prepare students for practicing law in the globalized atmosphere of the 21st century by broadening their understanding of International and Civil Law. Four 3-credit courses will be offered; each student must enroll in two of the four courses offered.*

All courses comply with the standards of the American Bar Association, and the program has been approved by the Accreditation Committee of the ABA Section on Legal Education.

Although generally credits earned in an A.B.A. accredited program are completely transferable to your home school, it is unlikely that participation in a study abroad program for only one summer may accelerate graduation. Students are encouraged to check with their home schools and review the A.B.A. Standards for Approval of Law Schools, Rule 304 and Interpretation 304-4, if they desire to accelerate graduation.

*Students must choose one 9:00 a.m. course and one 11:00 a.m. course. The program will be limited to 140 students. Required casebooks and text materials must be purchased by the students at their expense prior to departure for Spain.

*Due to the accelerated pace of the curriculum program, weekday afternoons should be devoted to study. Weekend trips are optional for students.

Courses

International Human Rights and Religion
Monday - Friday – 9:00am - 10:50am
Professor Gordon Butler
LAW 966-B

This course will explore the protections afforded by international human rights instruments modeled on and derived from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the practice of the major world religions. Students will explore the major tenets, practices, and beliefs of the worlds’ religions and the conflicts that arise when such tenets, practices, and beliefs interact with the civil authorities and with other religions. Case studies will explore the response of various religious traditions to the human rights standards and demonstrate ways such standards have protected vital interests such as liberty of conscience, religious pluralism and equality, free exercise of religion, nondiscrimination on religious grounds, and autonomy for religious groups. The course will seek to understand the importance of an appropriate balance for the interaction between law and religion in a thriving twenty-first century global society.

Internet Governance Law and Policy
Monday - Friday – 9:00am - 10:50am
Professor Roy Balleste
LAW 811-A

This course analyzes the legal and technological landscape faced by nations as they seek to adopt internet governance policies. This course covers the laws, regulations, and entities that seek to manage and regulate the Internet. The class analyzes the Internet, its impact in society and how international law has evolved around the governance of this technology. The issue of global internet governance raises challenging questions about where the control of the Internet should reside. The course will consider governance activities by the U.S. government, their relationship to the technical coordination of the Internet and the interests of global stakeholders. Topics to be discussed include the role of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the U.S. Department of Commerce, and the governance models for the control of the Internet. The participation in the global debate of this issue represents a significant challenge, although one rooted in human rights and the protection of access to information.

Selected Topics in International Law
(Maritime Law and Treasure Salvage in International Waters)
Monday - Friday – 11:00am - 12:50pm
Professor Taylor Simpson-Wood
LAW 700-A1

Far beneath the ocean waves, nestling silently on cold dark sea beds around the world, lie the remains of about three million shipwrecks. Among such wrecks are the coveted treasure vessels. In addition to valuable cargos of gold, silver, or jewels, these shipwrecks can also be a significant source of history derived from archaeological examination. This course will examine the relevant maritime law in the area of international treasure salvage, in particular the law of salvage and that of finds, and the key international convention in this area, the 2001 UNESCO Convention on Underwater Cultural Heritage which went into effect in 2009. The main themes of the course will be the same as those with which the UNESCO negotiators grappled: the question of ownership rights in sunken vessels and cargoes; sovereign immunity and sunken warships; the application of salvage law; the ethics of commercial exploitation; and, most crucially, the question of jurisdictional competence to regulate activities beyond territorial sea limits. To see these issues in action, the discovery and ensuing litigation surrounding three vessels will be examined: the RMS Titanic, the SS Central America, and the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes. During the course, the tension which exists between those who view treasure hunters as "looters" of the world's underwater cultural heritage and those who see treasure hunting as "commercial salvage" will also be considered.

State, Federal, and International Copyright Law
Monday - Friday – 11:00am - 12:50pm
Professor Glen-Peter Ahlers
LAW 965

This course will explore and survey legal issues associated with state, federal, and international copyright law. Topics will include: what works are protected by copyright, what rights are granted to a copyright owner for how long, what constitutes copyright infringement, how to enforce copyright protection, and defenses to infringement actions. The course is designed to provide not only a solid foundation in U.S. copyright law, but an understanding of the basic international copyright agreements such as The Berne Convention, the Universal Copyright Convention, and the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs).

Materials for Registered Students - Summer 2018

Textbook List

  • International Human Rights and Religion (Law 966-B)
    Professor Gordon Butler
    Course Documents
  • Internet Governance Law and Policy (Law 811-A)
    Professor Roy Balleste
    Course Documents
  • Selected Topics in International Law (Law 700-A1)
    Professor Taylor Simpson-Wood
    Course Documents
  • State, Federal, and International Copyright Law (Law 965)
    Professor Glen-Peter Ahlers
    Course Documents